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Industrial Engineer Engineering and Management Solutions at Work

September 2014    |    Volume: 46    |    Number: 9

The member magazine of the Institute of Industrial Engineers

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FEATURES

What I should have taught 

What I should have taught

For 22 years, I did not know that significant chunks of the syllabi of some core IE courses have been rendered obsolete by the industrial engineering developed and practiced by Toyota. This “real” industrial engineering needs to replace current IE curricula. If not, the gap between the obsolete IE of academia and the IE fundamentals that comprise lean Six Sigma will persist.
By Shahrukh A. Irani  

Making 3-D futures reality 

Making 3-D futures reality

The set of technologies colloquially referred to as 3-D printing recently has gained significant visibility in the academic and industrial communities as well as media outlets and the public eye. This set of emerging technologies has been viewed from profoundly different angles.
By Alaa Elwany 

Continuously improving sustainability 

Continuously improving sustainability

With the success of the lean initiative behind them, officials at Rockwell Collins agreed to follow their customer’s suggestion once more. After two years of reporting, the Carbon Disclosure Project expressed concern that Rockwell Collins was not making enough progress, and the company needed to improve its carbon reduction efforts.
By Brion Hurley, Carolyn McArtor and Cal Van’t Land 

Leaning a little too far 

Leaning a little too far

Analytical tools should focus on removing the impediments that keep healthcare activities from operating the way they were originally intended. The key is understanding the difference between efficiency and effectiveness and then letting empathy play a part in the decision-making process.
By Lou Keller 

 

Of dollars and sense 

Of dollars and sense

Value stream mapping always has been an excellent tool to document the flow of information and materials as they occur, summarize the activities visually, highlight sources for wastes, and envision a future state with better performance. But your VSMs can be used to make sense, both dollars and cents, of the process flow and enhance decision-making to improve the overall financial performance of your business.
By Christopher D. Chapman 

 


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